Geelong World Cup winner Katheryn Curi-Mattis joins Vanderkitten-Focus – Cycling Update

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William Lozito

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  • Geelong World Cup winner Katheryn Curi-Mattis joins Vanderkitten-Focus – Cycling Update

Geelong World Cup winner Katheryn Curi-Mattis joins Vanderkitten-Focus – Cycling Update

The former Geelong 2008 World Cup winner’s Katheryn Curi-Mattis will join the Vanderkitten Focus team for the upcoming season. He is currently riding for Webcor Builders Women's Professional Cycling team, who has announced their demise today.  

The 37-year-old Mattis has retired from professional racing and will act as co-director with Jono Coulter and as training, racing mentor to the squad. She is one of the most accomplished US athletes in Women Cycling.

 Mattis told the media that, Jono and Vanderkitten did good job in building strong team in 2011 season so she also wants to help the team. She added, "The opportunity presented it after the development team I was working with this year - the Alto Velo Bridge Team -  folded and I still wanted to be involved in working with development riders.”

The American racing cyclist Mattis is the true animator of competition in her career. In February 2008, she won Geelong World Cup with solo move and beating her breakaway companion Emma Rickards.

In 2005 season, she won the United States National Road Race championships in Park City and also took third place in first stage of Tour of the Gila. In 2007 season, Mattis continued her effort and gained a lead in first stage of Tour de Toona.

The American gained a successful lead in 2008 season and won the prologue and third stage of Green Mountain Stagerace, due to her good effort she took overall leader’s jersey. In 2009 season, she claimed first spot in Mount Hamilton in 2009 season. In 2010, she took fifth stage of Tour de l’Aude cycliste Feminin by easily beat Annemiek van Vleuten and Liesbet De Vocht.

Mattis said that she advises the cyclists to be fully conscious while riding on the bike rather than just focusing on the wheels because taking the calculated risks is part of bike racing.

She added, "I do hope to do some on-the-bike mentoring as a way to really provide the gals with instant feedback. Especially now with no radios, it makes communication between director and rider hard. For younger riders, having that instant feedback will be invaluable."

Let see, how she help her new team as co-director.